Delta flooding: More families displaced as water level continues to rise

Delta flooding: More families displaced as water level continues to rise

 

The number of families made homeless and farmlands washed away in Delta State as a result of raging flood waters continues to rise.

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As the water level rises, the state government has opened three camps for internally displaced people in response to the worsening humanitarian crisis.

Residential and commercial buildings in low-land parts of Asaba along Anwai road have all been submerged as a result of water level which continues to rise daily.

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Residents are in a race against time to move their property to safer locations and Canoes have become the means of transportation.

Many are already counting their losses while some have utilised the opportunity to make brisk business ferrying commuters and their property to dry land.

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While others prefer wading through on foot, perhaps unwilling to part with scarce financial resources at this difficult time.

some resilient tricycle drivers who attempted to drive through the surging waters ended up inside the water.

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The Canoe remains the safest option, especially for traders coming from the Ugbolu market.

The Delta state government, after a meeting of the 2022 Flood Disaster Management Committee approved the opening of three Internally Displaced Persons Camps.

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They will provide temporary accommodation for hundreds of victims until the flood waters recede, enough for them to return to their homes and what is left of their farmlands and other businesses.

Reprieve is not likely to come the way of thousands of Delta residents any time soon as more buildings are under threat of being submerged.

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This is because the flooding is made worse by the constant rainfall.

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